03.12.2014

Do I Have to Hire an ASL Interpreter?

Posted by:
Rae Rose

Category:
Featured, Videos

This is one of the more common questions I’m asked as an agency owner. It’s nice that people trust me to answer honestly, and the answer is usually yes, but this information needs to be shared more broadly. I’m not a lawyer, but I do have a pretty good handle on how the ADA applies to sign language interpreting services. This open-captioned video also clears up some related questions, like how interpreting services are actually funded. This is a great video to share with colleagues; once you get it figured out you can help other offices who may encounter the same situation.

If you’re looking for reasons to not hire an interpreter or for loopholes in the ADA, call your attorney for help with that.


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Posted by: Rae Rose

Rachel (“Rae”) is the proud owner of Rose Interpreting. A family friend introduced her to deafness and sign language as a child. She was amazed when she saw that interpreting could make a difference even for children.


5 Comments

I’m so glad I found this. My mom is in Hospice and both of my parents are deaf. To this day not one ASL interpreter has been there. The Hospice keeps saying they can not find one. I know for a fact they can as we are not that far from Madison, WI and I had an interpreter tell me that it is possible and to get that hospice to sign something saying so, I have spoke with the social worker and let her know I would like signed letter saying it is not possible. They said they would let me know Monday. They have had since February to find one and yet nothing? Again so glad I saw this and thanks.

Allyn,

First, my heart goes out to you. Losing a parent is so incredibly hard.

I’m glad you’re fighting for your parents’ rights, but I wish you didn’t have to. Please do share the video and anything else on this site that you think might help educate your mother’s hospice staff. I would also recommend getting in touch with an attorney. It’s not as intimidating as you may think, and after so many months of denying services it may be your family’s only option to make sure your parents can communicate with the hospice staff. Hopefully it won’t be necessary, but it is an option. There are even attorneys who work pro-bono in these cases, or on contingencies.

We’re here for you, and wish you a speedy resolution on the interpreting issue. If you need more help, just use the contact page to email directly.

–Rae

Allyn,
My heart goes out to you and your family. My parents are also Deaf. I have dealt with similar situations with my parents and Deaf friends. Rae gave you wonderful advice.

I found found speaking with someone at the the Rocky Mountain ADA Center (formerly the Rocky Mountain ADA Technical Support Hotline) to be extremely helpful in such situations, answering my questions and concerns. They can provide you with guidance and WRITTEN DOCUMENTATION from the ADA law to give to anyone that is not providing an interpreter for your parent(s). They may refer you to an ADA center in your area, and I recommend that you keep their contact info with you. Knowledge is power. Businesses are welcome to talk to them too, and they will basically be told what Rae just explained, and I guarantee they will take the info seriously. Their contact info:
Rocky Mountain ADA Center
800.949.4232 voice
719.358.2460 VP
http://www.adainformation.org
[email protected]

I also recommend to have on hand contact information to reputable sign language agencies in your parents area to give to the hospice or any business. If they say they can’t find a qualified interpreter, find out which agency(s) they contacted and when. Then contact the agency to see if they were contacted or not. ;-) Document as much info as you can if you need to pursue matters further, such as hiring an attorney.

Allyn, I wish you the best and I’m sorry for your loss.

Coda Hugs,
Michelle

P.S. Rae, your vlog is champ! I’m proud to be one of your terps!

Allyn,
My heart goes out to you and your family. My parents are also Deaf. I have dealt with similar situations with my parents and Deaf friends. I wish I saw this sooner. Rae gave you wonderful advice.

I found found speaking with someone at the the Rocky Mountain ADA Center (formerly the Rocky Mountain ADA Technical Support Hotline) to be extremely helpful in such situations, answering my questions and concerns. They can provide you with guidance and WRITTEN DOCUMENTATION from the ADA law to give to anyone that is not providing an interpreter for your parent(s). They may refer you to an ADA center in your area, and I recommend that you keep their contact info with you. Knowledge is power. Businesses are welcome to talk to them too, and they will basically be told what Rae just explained, and I guarantee they will take the info seriously. Their contact info:
Rocky Mountain ADA Center
800.949.4232 voice
719.358.2460 VP
http://www.adainformation.org
[email protected]

I also recommend to have on hand contact information to reputable sign language agencies in your parents area to give to the hospice or any business. If they say they can’t find a qualified interpreter, find out which agency(s) they contacted and when. Then contact the agency to see if they were contacted or not. ;-) Document as much info as you can if you need to pursue matters further, such as hiring an attorney.

Allyn, I wish you the best and I’m sorry for your loss.

Coda Hugs,
Michelle

P.S. Rae, your vlog is champ! I’m proud to be one of your terps!

Michelle,

Thank you so much for your input on this and your kind words. We’re certainly lucky to have you on the roster.

Hopefully this (and other posts) can become “living documents” that can evolve with time and good responses like we’re seeing here.

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